What areas does OT address?

  COGNITIVE & PERCEPTUAL
  • Attention to task
  • Organizational skills
  • Visual discrimination: identifying similarities and differences
  • Visual spatial: identifying reversals of objects
  • Visual memory: recalling or reproducing a letter, object  or figure
  • Form constancy: finding a shape when its rotated or resized
  • Figure ground: finding an object within a busy background
  • Visual closure: identifying parts that make a whole

  SELF CARE
  • Orienting clothing, shoes, and socks
  • Right & left and front & back discrimination
  • Strategies and techniques for dressing
  • Feeding: grasp, bilateral coordination
  • Bathing
  • Hygiene, toileting, and grooming

  FINE MOTOR
  • Finger & hand strength, position and stability
  • Pencil grasp and control
  • Wrist/forearm control
  • Isolated finger movement and coordination
  • Scissor and tool manipulation
  • Speed and dexterity
  • Handwriting

  GROSS MOTOR
  • Ball skills: throwing and catching
  • Balance and running
  • Bilateral coordination

  SENSORY INTEGRATION/PROCESSING
  • Addressing hypo and hyper responsiveness to tactile, vestibular, proprioceptive, auditory, visual, oral, and olfactory inputs that may affect a child's occupational performance in daily activities

  OTHER AREAS INCLUDE
  •   STRENGTH     
  •   MOTOR PLANNING (PRAXIS)
  •   ADAPTIVE MODIFICATIONS  
  •   INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS
  •   ENDURANCE
  •   PLAY SKILLS
  •   SOCIAL SKILLS
Some things to look for.......

  COGNITIVE & PERCEPTUAL
  • Inattention & distractibility for written and/or reading tasks
  • Difficulty with letter recognition & reproduction
  • Letter reversals
  • Poor orientation of puzzle pieces or line orientation during handwriting tasks
  • Difficulty copying from blackboard and/or textbook
  • Difficulty or unable to complete mazes or dot-to-dots
  • Letter omissions or dropping letters from the end of a written word


  SELF CARE
  • Putting clothing on backwards
  • Putting shoes on the wrong feet
  • Difficulty with buttons, snaps, zippers, or shoelaces
  • Messy eaters
  • Difficulty holding a toothbrush, utensils, or comb


  FINE MOTOR
  • Disliking fine motor activities
  • Poor pencil and/or scissor grasp
  • Clumsy grasp & release skills
  • Difficulty holding small objects or manipulating tools
  • Easily fatigues when coloring or writing



  GROSS MOTOR
  • Fear or avoidance of gross motor activities
  • Unable to hop, skip, or jump
  • Difficulty coordinating both sides of the body such as walking on stairs or riding a bicycle/tricycle


  SENSORY INTEGRATION/PROCESSING
  • Speak with a qualified professional as Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) may manifest with your child experiencing difficulty in their level of alertness, social, and motor skill development